The Crown Prosecution Service and the black market for personal data

The Crown Prosecution Service is not my favourite state agency.

Their leadership is too closely linked to News Corp and the Labour Party, and they don’t seem to take seriously enough the business of prosecuting people for data snooping. The fewer prosecutions, the lower the risk of punishment, the greater the long-run rewards for ransacking personal data holdings and flogging them off on the black market.

The Bank of England by its actions regulates the supply of credit within the economy. By failing to prosecute in sufficient numbers those who abuse their authorised access to personal data and then sell it to newspapers, private detectives, political extremists, criminals, the KGB, etc, etc, the CPS regulates the size of the black market in personal data. I have submitted a FOIA request to ascertain whether the CPS does any economic modelling to work out how harmful these crimes are when deciding how many of them to prosecute. They ignored some of the questions in a previous request on this subject, so I’ve effectively resubmitted one of the questions they pretended omitted to answer.

When I submitted this, I got an automatic courtesy response, advising me of the deadline they have to meet, which is on Monday. I’ve waited until today, the preceding Friday, before responding “thank you for doing me the courtesy of a holding response about my recent FOIA request. I was delighted to read that you are required to respond on or before Monday. Have a good weekend!

I expect they’ll again fail to answer the question, and I’ll go to my MP.

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