Not muddying the waters about Euroscepticism

The author of this Kosmopolit article makes the claim that it’s silly to label people or arguments using the terms “Europhile” and “Eurosceptic”.

That’s just wrong; the terms work perfectly fine, they describe whether someone favours the EU vis-a-vis the member states (or similar actors). If you want your country to leave the EU, you’re a Eurosceptic. If you want to repatriate powers, you’re a Eurosceptic. If you oppose the transfer or arrogation of new powers to the EU, you’re a Eurosceptic. The converse positions make you a Europhile.

Where it gets interesting (and in the Kosmopolit article, this is where the straw-man style argumentation and rhetorical questions all start to appear) is in two areas: internal conflicts between EU institutions, and situations where the EU does things that particular Eurosceptics support.

Eurosceptics are just not going to agree with each otherabout intra-institutional conflicts between Council, Court, Commission and Parliament. Why should they? It’s like asking people who favour labour against capital which side they back in a dispute between shareholders, board and management: their ideology just doesn’t discriminate at that level of detail, though individuals might have opinions on a general or case by case basis. It’s a matter of strategy and tactics, not an issue of principle.

Similarly, there will be cases where Eurosceptics are divided about particular EU policies, such as the Euro, surveillance, IP laws, etc. Ignoring the people who tactically support bad policies in the hope of hastening the EU’s demise, there’s no reason that people who want less EU power are going to agree on any other issue: Tony Benn, Margaret Thatcher, Enoch Powell, Michael Foot, Bob Crow, Nigel Farage, Dan Hannan, Dennis Healey, David Owen, and Kate Hoey are all over the political “spectrum”. It’s inevitable that the EU will often do things that some of them support. One principled view is to say that one opposes all exercises of competences that the EU should not have, and this is completely normal in the United States: Republican opponents of gay marriage nevertheless oppose federal bans on gay marriage on states rights’ grounds.

Once one has taken into account such positions, the Kosmopolit argument isn’t very convincing. He/she says “So just because I think the policy outcome is positive I am considered a “europhile”?”. A Question To Which The Answer Is No.

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